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Hoover Quest 1000 Robot Vacuum Review

This wi-fi enabled Hoover is too gentle to root out dirt.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

The name Hoover is synonymous with vacuums. In fact, in many countries it's even used as a verb. Watch enough British TV shows and you'll inevitably hear someone talking about Hoovering the floor to clean up a mess.

You might imagine that the storied company would have been among the first to plunge into the robot vacuum market. But Hoover's new lineup of robovacs came out a few weeks after models from other industry leaders, including Bissell and Dyson.

The Hoover Quest 1000 (MSRP $699.99) has a slick design and WiFi connectivity. When we let it loose in our obstacle course, it effortlessly glided along without careening into furniture or getting stuck on throw rugs. However, that gentleness comes at the cost of superior pickup. For a vacuum that sells for almost $700, it missed too much dirt and debris.

In other words, this robot is great at sprucing up the floor, but it's no good at Hoovering.

How well does it work?

After spending a week with it, we can safely say that this Hoover works well as a floor maintainer. It spent around 15 minutes cleaning up our robot obstacle course, but in that time it only picked up 8 grams of dirt. To put that in context, that's twice as fast than most robot vacuums, but with a little more than half the pickup.

While the Quest did not have the most robust clean overall, it didn't smack furniture or get stuck on carpets. When you combine its dexterity with a smartphone app, the Quest suddenly earns its keep.

Imagine you're at work and you get a text telling you that guests are coming over. Just tap a button on the simple smartphone app, and the Hoover will give your floors a once over—no matter where you are. We even directed the Quest to "trouble spots"—where we know dirt accumulates.

Of course, how well it works will depend on your home's WiFi connection. If you frequently find yourself unplugging your cable modem to reset it, chances are the Hoover won't always clean on command.

What are the biggest issues?

Brush
Credit: Reviewed.com / Jonathan Chan
The underside of the Quest showcases the tri-clean system: the side brush and the dual brush head in the middle. View Larger

As we like to say in the lab, "A robot can't clean where its brushes haven't been." The Hoover Quest got into fewer places than some cheaper, but more aggressive, models. The reason for this is that the more gentle a robot vacuum is, the less likely it is to scuff your furniture or get stuck.

The Hoover also failed to get atop our dark-colored, high-pile carpet. That's not a surprise: most of the robot vacuums we've tested are designed to shy away from tall carpets and dark surfaces so they don't get stuck, or fall down the stairs.

Who should buy this Hoover?

The Hoover Quest 1000 has three major competitors: the Dyson 360 Eye, the Neato Botvac Connected, and the iRobot 980. All three are high-end, WiFi-enabled robot vacuums.

The Quest costs less than the Dyson and the iRobot, but offers comparable dirt pickup. The Neato retails for around the same price and cleans better—which is why it remains our top pick.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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